The Persian Expedition, by Xenophon

It was now midday and the enemy had not yet come into sight. But in the early afternoon, dust appeared, like a white cloud, and after some time a sort of blackness extending a long way over the plain

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Civilisation, by Kenneth Clark

However complex and solid it seems, civilisation is actually quite fragile. It can be destroyed. What are its enemies?

Napoleon The Great, by Andrew Roberts

Although he probably never said ‘an army marches on his stomach’, as legend has it, he was always deeply conscious that it indubitably marched on its feet.

Taliesin, from The Mabinogion

And she went forth after him, running.
And he saw her, and changed himself into a hare and fled.
But she changed herself into a greyhound and turned him.
And he ran towards a river, and became a fish.

Memorabilia, by Xenophon

‘Tell me, Xenophon, have you not always believed Critobulus to be a man of sound sense, not wild and self-willed? Should you not have said that he was remarkable for his prudence rather than thoughtless or foolhardy?’ ‘Certainly that is what I should have said of him.’ said Xenophon ‘Then you are now to regard…

Who The Devil Made It by Peter Bogdanovich

‘I remember meeting Reagan at a Hollywood party in the seventies (after had been governor, before he became president); when I mentioned knowing Allan Dwan, Reagan’s face transformed completely: from pleasantly bored to excited, compelled: ‘How is Alan? Give him my best, will you? I remember him very fondly.’ By now Reagan’s eyes had glazed…